Lord, Thou in all things like wast made

Lord, Thou in all things like wast made

Author: Joseph Anstice
Tune: ST. AGNES (Dykes)
Published in 8 hymnals

Printable scores: PDF, MusicXML
Audio files: MIDI

Full Text

1 Lord, Thou in all things like wast made
To us, yet free from sin,
Then how unlike to us, O Lord,
Replies the voice within.

2 Our faith is weak; O Light of Light,
Clear Thou our clouded view;
That Son of Man, and Son of God,
We give Thee honor due.

3 O Son of Man, Thyself hast proved
Our trials and our tears;
Life's thankless toil and scant repose,
Death's agonies and fears.

4 O Son of God, in glory raised,
Thou sittest on Thy throne:
Thence, by Thy pleadings and Thy grace,
Still succoring Thine own.

5 Brother and Saviour, Friend and Judge!
To Thee, O Christ, be given
To bind upon Thy crown the names
Most blest in earth and heaven.


Source: The Hymnal: published by the Authority of the General Assembly of the Presbyterian Church in the U.S.A. #203

Author: Joseph Anstice

Anstice, Joseph , M.A., son of William Anstice of Madeley, Shropshire, born 1808, and educated at Enmore, near Bridgwater, Westminster, and Ch. Church, Oxford, where he gained two English prizes and graduated as a double-first. Subsequently, at the ago of 22, he became Professor of Classical Literature at King's College, London; died at Torquay, Feb. 29, 1836, aged 28. His works include Richard Coeur de Lion, a prize poem, 1828; The Influence of the Roman Conquest upon Literature and the Arts in Rome (Oxford prize Essay); Selections from the Choice Poetry of the Greek Dramatic Writers, translated into English Verse, 1832, &c. His hymns were printed a few months after his death, as:— Hymns by the late Joseph Anstice, M.A., formerly Student… Go to person page >

Text Information

First Line: Lord, Thou in all things like wast made
Author: Joseph Anstice
Language: English
Copyright: Public Domain


Lord, Thou in all things like wert [wast] made. J. Anstice. [Passiontide.] First published in his (posthumous) Hymns, 1836, No. 21, in 6 stanzas of 4 lines, and again in the Child's Christian Year, 1841. From the Child's Christian Year it passed as, "In all things like Thy brethren, Thou," into the Leeds Hymn Book, 1853, No. 295. This form of the hymn has become popular, and especially with the Nonconformists. It is sometimes attributed to J. Keble.

--John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology (1907)


ST. AGNES (Dykes)

John B. Dykes (PHH 147) composed ST. AGNES for [Jesus the Very Thought of Thee]. Dykes named the tune after a young Roman Christian woman who was martyred in A.D. 304 during the reign of Diocletian. St. Agnes was sentenced to death for refusing to marry a nobleman to whom she said, "I am already eng…

Go to tune page >



The Cyber Hymnal #3961
  • Adobe Acrobat image (PDF)
  • Noteworthy Composer score (NWC)
  • XML score (XML)