Meet and right it is to sing, In every time and place

Full Text

1 Meet and right it is to sing,
In every time and place,
Glory to our heavenly King,
The God of truth and grace.
Join we then with sweet accord,
All in one thanksgiving join!
Holy, holy, holy Lord,
Eternal praise be thine!

2 Thee, the first-born sons of light,
In choral symphonies,
Praise by day, day without night,
And never, never cease;
Angels and archangels, all
Praise the mystic Three in One;
Sing, and stop, and gaze, and fall,
O'erwhelmed before thy throne!

3 Father, God, thy love we praise,
Which gave thy Son to die;
Jesus, full of truth and grace,
Alike we glorify;
Spirit, Comforter divine.
Praise by all to thee be given,
Till we in full chorus join,
And earth is turned to heaven.

Source: The Voice of Praise: a collection of hymns for the use of the Methodist Church #106

Author: Charles Wesley

Charles Wesley, M.A. was the great hymn-writer of the Wesley family, perhaps, taking quantity and quality into consideration, the great hymn-writer of all ages. Charles Wesley was the youngest son and 18th child of Samuel and Susanna Wesley, and was born at Epworth Rectory, Dec. 18, 1707. In 1716 he went to Westminster School, being provided with a home and board by his elder brother Samuel, then usher at the school, until 1721, when he was elected King's Scholar, and as such received his board and education free. In 1726 Charles Wesley was elected to a Westminster studentship at Christ Church, Oxford, where he took his degree in 1729, and became a college tutor. In the early part of the same year his religious impressions were much deepene… Go to person page >

Notes

Meet and right it is to sing, At every time and place. C.Wesley. [Watchnight. Choral Festivals.] Published in Hymns and Sacred Poems, 1749, vol. ii., No. 97, in 4 stanzas of 8 lines. It is No. 14 of 19 "Hymns for the Watchnight"; and together with others from the same Watchnight hymns was frequently reprinted in a separate form (Poetical Works, 1868-72, vol. v. p. 279). It was included, with slight alterations, in the Wesleyan Hymn Book, 1780, No. 212, and has been repeated in several collections in Great Britain and America. Although originally written as a Watchnight hymn it can be easily adapted for Choral Festivals, and as such it would be a hymn of great merit.

--John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology (1907)

Meet and right it is to sing; Glory to our God and King. C. Wesley. [Holy Communion.] This paraphrase of the words of "The Order for the Administration of the Lord's Supper," &c, in the Book of Common Prayer, " It is very meet, right, and our bounden duty," &c. was published in Hymns and Sacred Poems, 1740, in 7 stanzas of 4 lines (Poetical Works, 1868-72, vol. i. p. 286). In 1753 G. Whitefield gave stanzas i.-iii. and vi. in an altered form in his Collection of Hymns, as No. 61. This form was repeated by M. Madan in his Psalms & Hymns, 1760, and again by several others, including Bickersteth, in his Christian Psalmody, 1833, (in 3 stanzas), and thus came into use in the Church of England.

--John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology (1907)

Tune

AMSTERDAM

For more tune info, see Zahn 7341a or Hymn Tune Index 1648a-d. Note that attributions to James Nares don't appear until after 1820.

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THORNCLIFF


HYMN TO JOY


Timeline

Media

The Cyber Hymnal #4194
  • Adobe Acrobat image (PDF)
  • Noteworthy Composer score (NWC)
  • XML score (XML)

Instances

Instances (1 - 4 of 4)Text InfoTune InfoTextScoreFlexScoreAudioPage Scan
Hymns and Psalms: a Methodist and ecumenical hymn book #501
Singing the Faith #32
Small Church Music #3804Audio
The Cyber Hymnal #4194TextScoreAudio
Include 61 pre-1979 instances



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