My Master was a worker

Full Text

1. My Master was a worker,
With daily work to do,
And he who would be like Him
Must be a worker, too.
Then welcome honest labor,
And honest labor’s fare,
For where there is a worker,
The Master’s man is there.

2. My Master was a comrade,
A trusty friend and true,
And he who would be like Him,
Must be a comrade, too.
In happy hour of singing,
In silent hours of care,
Where goes a loyal comrade,
The Master’s man is there.

3. My Master was a helper,
The woes of life He knew,
And he who would be like Him
Must be a helper, too.
The burden will grow lighter,
If each will take a share,
And where there is a helper,
The Master’s man is there.

4. Then, brothers brave and manly,
Together let us be,
For He, who is our Master,
The Man of men was He.
The men who would be like Him
Are wanted everywhere,
And where they love each other
The Master’s men are there.

Source: The Cyber Hymnal #4291

Author: W. G. Tarrant

Tarrant, William George, B.A., b. 1853. Since 1883 Minister of the Wandsworth Unitarian Christian Church. Editor of The Inquirer, 1888-97. One of the editors of the Essex Hall Hymnal. 1890, and of the Revised ed., 1902. 1. Come, let us Join with faithful souls. The Faithful. 2. Draw nigh to God; He will draw nigh to you. The Divine Helper. 3. Long ago the lilies faded. The Constant Presence. 4. The Light along the ages. Easter. 5. With happy voices ringing. Children's Praise. --John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology, New Supplement (1907)  Go to person page >

Text Information

First Line: My Master was a worker
Author: W. G. Tarrant



Published in a chapel hymnal for the Duke of W├╝rtemberg (Gesangbuch der Herzogl, 1784), ELLACOMBE (the name of a village in Devonshire, England) was first set to the words "Ave Maria, klarer und lichter Morgenstern." During the first half of the nineteenth century various German hymnals altered the…

Go to tune page >

SEASONS (Mendelssohn)


William Lloyd (b. Rhos Goch, Llaniestyn, Caernarvonshire, Wales, 1786; d. Caernarvonshire, 1852) composed MEIRIONYDD, which was first published in manuscript form with the name BERTH in Caniadau Seion (Songs of Zion, 1840, ed. R. Mills). The tune is named after the Welsh county Meirionydd in which L…

Go to tune page >



The Cyber Hymnal #4291
  • Adobe Acrobat image (PDF)
  • Noteworthy Composer score (NWC)
  • XML score (XML)