My soul, now praise thy Maker!

Full Text

1 My soul, now bless your Maker!
Let all within me bless His name
Who makes you full partaker
Of mercies more than you dare claim.
Forget Him not whose meekness
Still bears with all your sin,
Who heals your ev'ry weakness,
Renews your life within;
Whose grace and care are endless
And saved you through the past;
Who leaves no suff'rer friendless
But rights the wronged at last.

2 He offers all His treasure
Of justice, truth, and righteousness,
His love beyond all measure,
His yearning pity o'er distress,
Nor treats us as we merit,
But sets His anger by.
The poor and contrite spirit
Finds His compassion nigh;
And high as heav'n above us,
As dawn from close of day,
So far, since He has loved us,
He puts our sins away.

3 For as a tender father
Has pity on His children here,
God in His arms will gather
All who are His in childlike fear.
He knows how frail our powers
Who but from dust are made.
We flourish like the flowers,
And even so we fade;
The wind but o'er them passes,
And all their bloom is o'er.
We wither like the grasses;
Our place knows us no more.

4 His grace remains forever,
And children's children yet shall prove
That God forsakes them never
Who in true fear shall seek His love.
In heav'n is fixed His dwelling;
His rule is over all;
O hosts with might excelling,
With praise before Him fall.
Praise Him forever reigning,
All you who hear His Word--
Our life and all sustaining.
My soul, O praise the Lord!



Source: Lutheran Service Book #820

Author: Johann Poliander

Poliander, Johann was the pen-name of Johann Graumann who was b. July 5, 1487, at Neustadt in the Bavarian Palatinate. He studied at Leipzig (M.A. 1516, B.D. 1520), and was, in 1520, appointed rector of the St. Thomas School at Leipzig. He attended the Disputation in 1519 between Dr. Eck, Luther, and Oarlstadt, as the amanuensis of Eck; with the ultimate result that he espoused the cause of the Reformation and left Leipzig in 1522. In 1523 he became Evangelical preacher at Wurzburg, but left on the outbreak of the Peasants' War in 1525, and went to Nürnberg, where, about Lent, he was appointed preacher to the nunnery of St. Clara. He then, at the recommendation of Luther, received from the Margrave Albrecht of Brandenburg an invitation to… Go to person page >

Translator: Catherine Winkworth

Catherine Winkworth is "the most gifted translator of any foreign sacred lyrics into our tongue, after Dr. Neale and John Wesley; and in practical services rendered, taking quality with quantity, the first of those who have laboured upon German hymns. Our knowledge of them is due to her more largely than to any or all other translators; and by her two series of Lyra Germanica, her Chorale Book, and her Christian Singers of Germany, she has laid all English-speaking Christians under lasting obligation." --Annotations of the Hymnal, Charles Hutchins, M.A., 1872… Go to person page >

Text Information

First Line: My soul, now praise thy Maker!
German Title: Nun lob, mein Seel, den Herren
Author: Johann Poliander (1540)
Translator: Catherine Winkworth (1863)
Meter: 7.8.7.8.7.6.7.6.7.6.7.6
Language: English

Tune

NUN LOB, MEIN SEEL

Johann (Hans) Kugelmann (b. Augsburg, Germany, c. 1495; d. Konigsberg, Germany, 1542) adapted NUN LOB, MEIN SEEL from the song “Weiss mir ein Blümlein blaue” and first published the tune in his Concentus Novi (1540). A bar form, this German chorale consists of six long lines sharing some simila…

Go to tune page >


NUN LOB


Timeline

Media

The Cyber Hymnal #4367
  • Adobe Acrobat image (PDF)
  • Noteworthy Composer score (NWC)
  • XML score (XML)

Instances

Instances (1 - 6 of 6)Text InfoTune InfoTextScoreFlexScoreAudioPage Scan
Christian Worship: a Lutheran hymnal #257TextPage Scan
Evangelical Lutheran Hymnary #456TextPage Scan
Lutheran Service Book #820TextPage Scan
Lutheran Worship #453Text
Small Church Music #1789Audio
The Cyber Hymnal #4367TextScoreAudio
Include 23 pre-1979 instances



Advertisements