My soul once had its plenteous years

My soul once had its plenteous years

Author: John Newton
Tune: DEUS TUORUM MILITUM
Published in 3 hymnals

Printable scores: PDF, MusicXML
Audio files: MIDI

Full Text

1. My soul once had its plenteous years,
And throve, with peace and comfort filled,
Like the fat kine and ripened ears,
Which Pharaoh in his dream beheld.

2. With pleasing frames and grace received,
With means and ordinances fed;
How happy for a while I lived,
And little feared the want of bread.

3. But famine came and left no sign
Of all the plenty I had seen;
Like the dry ears and half-starved kine,
I then looked withered, faint and lean.

4. To Joseph the Egyptians went,
To Jesus I made known my case;
He, when my little stock was spent,
Opened His magazine of grace.

5. For He the time of dearth foresaw,
And made provision long before;
That famished souls, like me, might draw
Supplies from His unbounded store.

6. Now on His bounty I depend,
And live from fear of dearth secure,
Maintained by such a mighty Friend,
I cannot want till He is poor.

7. O sinners, hear His gracious call!
His mercy’s door stands open wide,
He has enough to feed you all,
And none who come shall be denied.

Source: The Cyber Hymnal #4368

Author: John Newton

Newton, John, who was born in London, July 24, 1725, and died there Dec. 21, 1807, occupied an unique position among the founders of the Evangelical School, due as much to the romance of his young life and the striking history of his conversion, as to his force of character. His mother, a pious Dissenter, stored his childish mind with Scripture, but died when he was seven years old. At the age of eleven, after two years' schooling, during which he learned the rudiments of Latin, he went to sea with his father. His life at sea teems with wonderful escapes, vivid dreams, and sailor recklessness. He grew into an abandoned and godless sailor. The religious fits of his boyhood changed into settled infidelity, through the study of Shaftesbury and… Go to person page >

Text Information

First Line: My soul once had its plenteous years
Author: John Newton

Tune

DEUS TUORUM MILITUM

DEUS TUORUM MILITUM (sometimes called GRENOBLE) was published in France in the 1753 Grenoble Antiphoner as a setting for the text "Deus tuorum militum" (“The God of Your Soldiers”). One of the finest French diocesan tunes from the eighteenth century, it represents a departure in Roman Catholic h…

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The Cyber Hymnal #4368
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  • Noteworthy Composer score (NWC)
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