O bread to pilgrims given

Full Text

1 O Bread to pilgrims given,
O Food that angels eat,
O Manna sent from heaven,
For heav'n-bom natures meet:
Give us, for thee long pining,
To eat till richly filled;
Till, earth's delights resigning,
Our every wish is stilled.

2 O Fountain, purely flowing
Forth from that sacred heart,
Our Saviour's grace bestowing,
True wine of life thou art.
O let us, freely tasting,
Our spirits' thirst assuage;
Thy goodness, never wasting,
Avails from age to age.

3 Jesus, this feast receiving,
We thee unseen adore;
Thy faithful word believing,
We take, and doubt no more:
Give us, thou true and loving,
On earth to live in thee;
Then, death the veil removing,
Thy glorious face to see.

Source: Hymns for Celebration: a supplement for use at holy communion today #20

Translator: Ray Palmer

Palmer, Ray, D.D., son of the Hon. Thomas Palmer, a Judge in Rhode Island, was born at Little Compton, Rhode Island, Nov. 12, 1808. His early life was spent at Boston, where he was for some time clerk in a dry-goods store. At Boston he joined the Park Street Congregational Church, then under the pastoral care of Dr. S. E. Dwight. After spending three years at Phillips Academy, Andover, he entered Yale College, New Haven, where he graduated in 1830. In 1835 he became pastor of the Central Congregational Church, Bath, Maine. During his pastorate there he visited Europe in 1847. In 1850 he was appointed to the First Congregational Church, at Albany, New York, and in 1865 Corresponding Secretary to the American Congregational Union, New York. H… Go to person page >

Author: Anonymous

In some hymnals, the editors noted that a hymn's author is unknown to them, and so this artificial "person" entry is used to reflect that fact. Obviously, the hymns attributed to "Author Unknown" "Unknown" or "Anonymous" could have been written by many people over a span of many centuries. Go to person page >

Text Information

First Line: O bread to pilgrims given
Latin Title: O Esca viatorum
Author: Anonymous (c. 17th cent.)
Translator: Ray Palmer
Meter: D
Language: English



The tune HERZLICH TUT MICH VERLANGEN has been associated with Gerhardt's text ["O Haupt voll Blut und Wunden"] since they were first published together in 1656. The tune's first association with a sacred text was its attachment in 1913 [sic: should read 1613] to Christoph Knoll's funeral text "Herzl…

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The Cyber Hymnal #4711
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Hymns and Psalms: a Methodist and ecumenical hymn book #620
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