O God, whose smile is in the sky

O God, whose smile is in the sky

Author: John Haynes Holmes
Published in 19 hymnals

Printable scores: PDF, MusicXML
Audio files: MIDI

Full Text

1. O God, whose smile is in the sky,
Whose path is in the sea,
Once more from earth’s tumultuous strife
We gladly turn to Thee.

2. Now all the myriad sounds of earth
In solemn stillness die;
While wind and wave unite to chant
Their anthem to the sky.

3. We come as those with toil far spent
Who crave Thy rest and peace,
And from the care and fret of life
Would find in Thee release.

4. O Father, soothe all troubled thought,
Dispel all idle fear,
Purge Thou each heart of secret sin,
And banish ev’ry care.

5. Until, as shine upon the sea
The silent stars above,
There shines upon our trusting souls
The light of Thine own love.

Source: The Cyber Hymnal #4939

Author: John Haynes Holmes

Born: November 29, 1879, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Died: April 3, 1964, New York City. Buried: Community Church of New York Unitarian Universalist, New York City. Holmes graduated from Harvard University, Phi Beta Kappa. His grandfather, John Cummings Haynes, manager of the Oliver Ditson music publishing house, helped pay his Harvard tuition. Holmes was ordained in 1904, and became minister of the Unitarian Third Congregational Church, Dorchester, Massachusetts. In February 1907, he became junior minister at the Church of the Messiah in New York City. His works include: I Speak for Myself, 1959 Collected Hymns, 1960 --www.hymntime.com/tch/ Go to person page >

Text Information

First Line: O God, whose smile is in the sky
Author: John Haynes Holmes

Tune

MARTYRDOM (Wilson)

MARTYRDOM was originally an eighteenth-century Scottish folk melody used for the ballad "Helen of Kirkconnel." Hugh Wilson (b. Fenwick, Ayrshire, Scotland, c. 1766; d. Duntocher, Scotland, 1824) adapted MARTYRDOM into a hymn tune in duple meter around 1800. A triple-meter version of the tune was fir…

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ST. AGNES (Dykes)

John B. Dykes (PHH 147) composed ST. AGNES for [Jesus the Very Thought of Thee]. Dykes named the tune after a young Roman Christian woman who was martyred in A.D. 304 during the reign of Diocletian. St. Agnes was sentenced to death for refusing to marry a nobleman to whom she said, "I am already eng…

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DENNY


Timeline

Media

The Cyber Hymnal #4939
  • Adobe Acrobat image (PDF)
  • Noteworthy Composer score (NWC)
  • XML score (XML)



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