O Lord my God, I cry to Thee

Full Text

1 0 Lord, my God, I cry to Thee;
In my distress Thou helpest me.
My soul and body I commend
Into Thy hands; Thine angel send
To guide me home and cheer my heart
When Thou dost call me to depart.

2 0 Jesus Christ, Thou Lamb of God,
Once slain to take away our load,
Now let Thy cross, Thine agony,
Avail to save and solace me,
Thy death, to open heav'n, and there
Bid me the joy of angels share.

3 0 Holy Spirit, faithful Friend,
Grant me Thy comfort to the end.
When death and hell assail me sore,
Leave me, oh, leave me, nevermore,
But bear me safely through the strife,
As Thou hast promised, into life.



Source: Evangelical Lutheran Hymnary #573

Translator: Catherine Winkworth

Catherine Winkworth is "the most gifted translator of any foreign sacred lyrics into our tongue, after Dr. Neale and John Wesley; and in practical services rendered, taking quality with quantity, the first of those who have laboured upon German hymns. Our knowledge of them is due to her more largely than to any or all other translators; and by her two series of Lyra Germanica, her Chorale Book, and her Christian Singers of Germany, she has laid all English-speaking Christians under lasting obligation." --Annotations of the Hymnal, Charles Hutchins, M.A., 1872… Go to person page >

Author: Nicolaus Selneccer

Selnecker, Nicolaus, D.D., son of Georg Selnecker (Selneccer, Schellenecker, who was protonotarius to the Nürnberg magistracy, but lived at Hersbruck near Nürnberg) was born at Hersbruck Dec. 5, 1532. In 1536 he was removed to Nürnberg, and became during his school time, when only twelve years old, organist at the chapel in the Kaiserburg there. He went to the university of Wittenberg in 1550 (where he became a favourite pupil of Melanchthon), graduated M.A. on July 31, 1554, and subsequently lectured as a privat-docent, sometimes to 200 students. In the end of 1557 he was appointed second court preacher at Dresden, and tutor to the heir apparent Prince Alexander, having also to supervise the education of the choirboys of the royal chape… Go to person page >

Text Information

First Line: O Lord my God, I cry to Thee
German Title: O Herre Gott, in meiner Not
Translator: Catherine Winkworth
Author: Nicolaus Selneccer (1587)
Meter: 8.8.8.8.8.8
Language: English
Copyright: Public Domain

Tune

VATER UNSER

Martin Luther's versification of the Lord's Prayer was set to this tune in Valentin Schumann's hymnal, Geistliche Lieder (1539); the tune, whose composer remains unknown, had some earlier use. The tune name derives from Luther's German incipit: “Vater unser im Himmelreich….” Because VATER UNSE…

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VENI CITO


ST. CATHERINE (Hemy)


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