O mystery of love Divine

O mystery of love Divine

Author: Thomas H. Gill (1864)
Tune: MANOAH
Published in 10 hymnals

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Audio files: MIDI

Full Text

1 O mystery of love Divine
That thought and thanks o'erpowers!
Lord Jesus, was our portion Thine,
And is Thy portion ours?

2 Emmanuel, didst Thou take our place
To set us in Thine own?
Didst Thou our low estate embrace
To lift us to Thy throne?

3 Didst Thou fulfil each righteous deed.
God's perfect will express,
That we the unfaithful ones might plead
Thy perfect faithfulness?

4 On Thy pure soul did dread and gloom
In that drear garden rise?
And ours the brightness and the bloom
Of Thine own Paradise?

5 For Thee the Father's hidden face?
For Thee the bitter cry?
For us the Father's endless grace,
The song of victory?

6 Our load of sin and misery
Didst Thou the Sinless bear?
Thy spotless robe of purity
Do we the sinners wear?

7 Lord Jesus, is it even so?
Have we been lov├Ęd thus?
What love can we on Thee bestow
Who hast exchanged with us?

8 Thou, who our very place didst take,
Dwell in our very heart;
Thou, who Thy portion ours dost make,
Thyself, Thyself, impart.

Amen.

The Hymnal: Published by the authority of the General Assembly of the Presbyterian Church in the U.S.A., 1895

Author: Thomas H. Gill

Gill, Thomas Hornblower, was born at Bristol Road, Birmingham, Feb. 10th, 1819. His parents belonged to English Presbyterian families which, like many others, had become Unitarian in their doctrine. He was educated at King Edward's Grammar School under Dr. Jeune, afterwards Bishop of Peterborough. He left the school in 1838, and would have proceeded to the University of Oxford, but was prevented by his hereditary Unitarianism (long since given up), which forbade subscription to the Articles of the Church of England then necessary for entrance to the University. This constrained him to lead the life of an isolated student, in which he gave himself chiefly to historical and theological subjects. Hence his life has been singularly devoid of ou… Go to person page >

Tune

MANOAH

MANOAH was first published in Henry W. Greatorex's Collection of Psalm and Hymn Tunes (1851). This anthology (later editions had alternate titles) contained one of the best tune collections of its era and included thirty-seven original compositions and arrangements by compiler Greatorex as well as m…

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The Cyber Hymnal #5192
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