O Splendor of God's glory bright, O Thou that bringest light from light

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1 O Splendor of God's glory bright,
O Thou that bringest light from light,
O Light of Light, light's living spring,
O Day, all days illumining:

2 Come, very Sun of truth and love;
Pour down Thy radiance from above
And shed the Holy Spirit's ray
On all we think or do or say.

3 With prayer the Father we implore:
O Father, glorious evermore,
We plead with Thee for grace and pow'r
To conquer in temptation's hour,

4 To guide whate'er we nobly do,
With love all envy to subdue,
To give us grace our wrongs to bear,
To make ill fortune turn to fair.

5 On Christ, the true bread, let us feed;
Let Him to us be drink indeed;
And let us taste with joyfulness
The Holy Spirit's plenteousness.

6 All laud to God the Father be;
All praise, eternal Son, to Thee;
All glory to the Spirit raise
In equal and unending praise.

Source: Lutheran Service Book #874

Translator: Robert Seymour Bridges

Bridges, Robert Seymour, M.A., son of J. J. Bridges, of Walmer, Kent, was b. Oct. 23, 1844, and educated at Eton and at Corpus Christi College, Oxford (B.A. 1867, M.A. 1874). He took his M.A. in 1874, but retired from practice in 1882, and now (1906) resides at Yattendon, Berks. He is the author of many poems and plays. He edition and contributed to the Yattendon Hymnal, 1899 (originally printed at the Oxford Univ. Press in parts—Nos. 1-25, 1895; 26-50, 1897; 51-75, 1898; 76-100, 1899). [Rev. James Mearns, M.A.] --John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology, New Supplement (1907)  Go to person page >

Author: St. Ambrose

Ambrosius (St. Ambrose), second son and third child of Ambrosius, Prefect of the Gauls, was born at Lyons, Aries, or Treves--probably the last--in 340 A.D. On the death of his father in 353 his mother removed to Rome with her three children. Ambrose went through the usual course of education, attaining considerable proficiency in Greek; and then entered the profession which his elder brother Satyrus had chosen, that of the law. In this he so distinguished himself that, after practising in the court of Probus, the Praetorian Prefect of Italy, he was, in 374, appointed Consular of Liguria and Aemilia. This office necessitated his residence in Milan. Not many months after, Auxentius, bishop of Milan, who had joined the Arian party, died; and m… Go to person page >




PUER NOBIS is a melody from a fifteenth-century manuscript from Trier. However, the tune probably dates from an earlier time and may even have folk roots. PUER NOBIS was altered in Spangenberg's Christliches GesangbUchlein (1568), in Petri's famous Piae Cantiones (1582), and again in Praetorius's (P…

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William Knapp (b. Wareham, Dorsetshire, England, 1698; d. Poole, Dorsetshire, 1768) composed WAREHAM, so named for his birthplace. A glover by trade, Knapp served as the parish clerk at St. James's Church in Poole (1729-1768) and was organist in both Wareham and Poole. Known in his time as the "coun…

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The Book of Common Praise: being the hymn book of The Church of England in Canada (revised 1938) #11a
The Cyber Hymnal #5340
  • Adobe Acrobat image (PDF)
  • Noteworthy Composer score (NWC)
  • XML score (XML)
The United Methodist Hymnal #679


Instances (1 - 9 of 9)Text InfoTune InfoTextScoreFlexScoreAudioPage Scan
Common Praise: A new edition of Hymns Ancient and Modern #7Text
Evangelical Lutheran Hymnary #81TextPage Scan
Evangelical Lutheran Worship #559
Hymnal 1982: according to the use of the Episcopal Church #5Text
Lutheran Service Book #874Text
Small Church Music #1396Audio
The Covenant Hymnal: a worshipbook #105
The Cyber Hymnal #5340TextScoreAudio
The United Methodist Hymnal #679TextScoreFlexScoreAudio
Include 29 pre-1979 instances