Oh, Venham Coroar!

Author(sts. 1, 3, 4): Matthew Bridges

Matthew Bridges was born at Malden, Essex, on July 14, 1800. He began his literary career with the publication of a poem, "Jerusalem Regained," in 1825; followed by a book entitled The Roman Empire under Constantine the Great, in 1828, its purpose being to examine "the real origin of certain papal superstitions." As a result of the influence of John Henry Newman and the Oxford Movement, Bridges became a Roman Catholic in 1848, and spent the latter part of his life in Canada. He died in Quebec on October 6, 1894. --Annotations of the Hymnal, Charles Hutchins, M.A., 1872… Go to person page >

Author (sts. 2, 4): Godfrey Thring

Thring, Godfrey, B.A., son of the Rev. J. G. D. Thring, of Alford, Somerset, was born at Alford, March 25, 1823, and educated at Shrewsbury School, and at Balliol College, Oxford, B.A. in 1845. On taking Holy Orders he was curate of Stratfield-Turgis, 1846-50; of Strathfieldsaye, 1850-53; and of other parishes to 1858, when he became rector of Alford-with-Hornblotton, Somerset. R.D. 1867-76. In 1876 he was preferred as prebend of East Harptree in Wells cathedral. Prebendary Thring's poetical works are:— Hymns Congregational and Others, 1866; Hymns and Verses, 1866; and Hymns and Sacred Lyrics, 1874. In 1880 he published A Church of England Hymnbook Adapted to the Daily Services of the Church throughout the Year; and in 1882, a revised and… Go to person page >

Translator: Werner Kaschel

(no biographical information available about Werner Kaschel.) Go to person page >

Text Information

First Line: Oh, venham coroar Jesus, o Salvador
Title: Oh, Venham Coroar!
English Title: Crown Him with Many Crowns
Translator: Werner Kaschel (1990)
Author (sts. 2, 4): Godfrey Thring (1874)
Author(sts. 1, 3, 4): Matthew Bridges (1851)
Language: Portuguese
Publication Date: 1991
Copyright: Copyright translation 1990 JUERP. All rights reserved.



Composed for Bridges's text by George J. Elvey (PHH 48), DIADEMATA was first published in the 1868 Appendix to Hymns Ancient and Modern. Since that publication, the tune has retained its association with this text. The name DIADEMATA is derived from the Greek word for "crowns." The tune is lively an…

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