Our Father, Who from Heaven Above

Our Father, who from heav'n above, Bids all of us to live in love

Author: Martin Luther, 1483-1546
Published in 3 hymnals

Full Text

1 Our Father, who from heav'n above
Bids all of us to live in love
As members of one family
And pray to You in unity,
Teach us no thouthless words to say
But from our inmost hearts to pray.

2 - 5 [protected by copyright]

6 Forgive our sins, Lord, we implore,
that they may trouble us no more;
We, too, will gladly those forgive
Who hurt us by the way they live.
Help us in our community
to serve each other willingly.

7 [protected by copyright]

8 From evil, Lord, deliver us;
The times and days are perilous.
Redeem us from eternal death,
And, when we yield our dying breath.
Console us, grant us calm release,
And take our souls to You in peace.

9 Amen, that is, so shall it be.
Make strong our faith in You, that we
May doubt not but with trust believe
That what we ask we shall receive.
Thus in Your name and at Your Word
We say, "Amen, O hear us, Lord!"

Source: Lutheran Service Book #766

Author: Martin Luther, 1483-1546

Luther, Martin, born at Eisleben, Nov. 10, 1483; entered the University of Erfurt, 1501 (B.A. 1502, M.A.. 1503); became an Augustinian monk, 1505; ordained priest, 1507; appointed Professor at the University of Wittenberg, 1508, and in 1512 D.D.; published his 95 Theses, 1517; and burnt the Papal Bull which had condemned them, 1520; attended the Diet of Worms, 1521; translated the Bible into German, 1521-34; and died at Eisleben, Feb. 18, 1546. The details of his life and of his work as a reformer are accessible to English readers in a great variety of forms. Luther had a huge influence on German hymnody. i. Hymn Books. 1. Ellich cristlich lider Lobgesang un Psalm. Wittenberg, 1524. [Hamburg Library.] This contains 8 German h… Go to person page >

Text Information

First Line: Our Father, who from heav'n above, Bids all of us to live in love
Title: Our Father, Who from Heaven Above
Author: Martin Luther, 1483-1546
Source: Translation composite
Publication Date: 1993
Copyright: Public Domain



Martin Luther's versification of the Lord's Prayer was set to this tune in Valentin Schumann's hymnal, Geistliche Lieder (1539); the tune, whose composer remains unknown, had some earlier use. The tune name derives from Luther's German incipit: “Vater unser im Himmelreich….” Because VATER UNSE…

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Instances (1 - 3 of 3)Text InfoTune InfoTextScoreFlexScoreAudioPage Scan
Christian Worship: a Lutheran hymnal #410TextPage Scan
Lutheran Service Book #766Text
Lutheran Worship #431