Oye un son en alta esfera

Author: Charles Wesley

Charles Wesley, M.A. was the great hymn-writer of the Wesley family, perhaps, taking quantity and quality into consideration, the great hymn-writer of all ages. Charles Wesley was the youngest son and 18th child of Samuel and Susanna Wesley, and was born at Epworth Rectory, Dec. 18, 1707. In 1716 he went to Westminster School, being provided with a home and board by his elder brother Samuel, then usher at the school, until 1721, when he was elected King's Scholar, and as such received his board and education free. In 1726 Charles Wesley was elected to a Westminster studentship at Christ Church, Oxford, where he took his degree in 1729, and became a college tutor. In the early part of the same year his religious impressions were much deepene… Go to person page >

Translator: Federico Fliedner

[Friedrich Ludwig Fliedner, Fritz Fliedner] Born: June 10, 1845, Kaiserswerth, Düsseldorf, Germany. Died: April 25, 1901, Madrid, Spain, of typhus. Buried: Civil cemetery, Madrid, Spain. Son of Theodor Fliedner, founder of the Kaiserswerth Deaconess Institute, Federico was educated at the Gymnasium in Gütersloh, studied theology at Halle (1864-46) and earned his PhD at Tübingen (1867). He served as a nurse in the Austro-Prussian war of 1866, and taught school for a year in rural Hilden. After ordination in 1870, he left Germany to be a missionary to Spain, settling in Madrid and becoming a chaplain at the German embassy. He learned Spanish, attended a Spanish high school, and studied medicine at the Universidad Central. Fliedn… Go to person page >

Text Information

First Line: Oye un son en alta esfera
English Title: Hark, the Herald Angels Sing
Author: Charles Wesley
Translator: Federico Fliedner
Language: Spanish
Refrain First Line: Canta la celeste voz



The tune is from the second chorus of Felix Mendelssohn's (PHH 279) Festgesang (Op. 68) for male voices and brass; it was first performed in 1840 at the Gutenberg Festival in Leipzig, a festival celebrating the anniversary of Gutenberg's invention of the printing press. Mendelssohn's tune is similar…

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