Peace, troubled soul! Thou need'st not fear

Full Text

1 Peace, troubled soul, thou need'st not fear!
Thy great Provider still is near;
Who fed thee last, will feed thee still;
Be calm, and sink into his will.

2 The Lord, who built the earth and sky,
In mercy stoops to hear thy cry;
His promise all may freely claim,
Ask and receive in Jesus' name.

3 His stores are open all, and free
To such as truly upright be;
Water and bread he'll give for food,
With all things else which he sees good.

4 Your sacred hairs, which are so small,
By God himself are numbered all;
This truth he's published all abroad,
That men may learn to trust the Lord.

5 The ravens daily he doth feed,
And sends them food as they have need;
Although they nothing have in store,
Yet as they lack he gives them more.

6 Then do not seek, with anxious care,
What ye shall eat, or drink, or wear;
Your heavenly Father will you feed;
He knows that all these things you need.

Source: The Voice of Praise: a collection of hymns for the use of the Methodist Church #127

Author: Samuel Ecking

Ecking, Samuel, a Baptist, born at Shrewsbury, Dec. 5, 1757, died Jan. 16, 1785, contributed hymns to the Gospel Magazine, in 1778 and 1779, under the signature of "S. E—k—-g." Of these the hymn, "Peace, peace, my soul," is in common use. This hymn is also found in his Essays on Grace, Faith, and Experience. [William T. Brooke] -- John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology (1907)  Go to person page >

Text Information

First Line: Peace, troubled soul! Thou need'st not fear
Author: Samuel Ecking


Peace, troubled soul, thou need'st not fear. (Confidence.] We have found this hymn in two forms. The first is in the Pocket Hymn Book, York, Spence, 5th ed., 1786 (possibly earlier), No. 183, in 8 stanzas of 4 lines. This passed into the American collections. The second form begins "Peace, peace, my soul, thou need'st not fear," and is appended to Sermon ii. on Matt. vi. 33, in S. Ecking's posthumous Essays on Grace, &c, Liverpool, W. Jones, 1806, in 7 stanzas of 4 lines. Neither is in the Gospel Magazine, 1779.

--John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology, Appendix, Part II (1907)





Lowell Mason (PHH 96) composed HAMBURG (named after the German city) in 1824. The tune was published in the 1825 edition of Mason's Handel and Haydn Society Collection of Church Music. Mason indicated that the tune was based on a chant in the first Gregorian tone. HAMBURG is a very simple tune with…

Go to tune page >



The Cyber Hymnal #5696
  • Adobe Acrobat image (PDF)
  • Noteworthy Composer score (NWC)
  • XML score (XML)