Return, my soul, and seek thy rest

Return, my soul, and seek thy rest

Author: Philip Doddridge
Tune: DEUS TUORUM MILITUM
Published in 15 hymnals

Printable scores: PDF, Noteworthy Composer
Audio files: MIDI

Full Text

1 Return, my soul, and seek thy rest
Upon thy heav’nly Father’s breast:
Indulge me, Lord, in that repose,
The soul which loves Thee only knows.

2 Lodged in Thine arms I fear no more
The tempest’s howl, the billows’ roar;
Those storms must shake th’Almighty’s seat,
Which violate the saints’ retreat.

3 Thy bounties, Lord, to me surmount
The power of language to recount;
From morning dawn, the setting sun
Sees but my work of praise begun.

4 The mercies, all my moments bring,
Ask an eternity to sing;
What thanks those mercies can suffice
Which thro’ eternity shall rise?

5 Rich in ten thousand gifts possessed,
In future hopes more richly blessed,
I’ll sit and sing, till death shall raise
A note of more proportioned praise.

Source: The Cyber Hymnal #10621

Author: Philip Doddridge

Doddridge, Philip, D.D., was born in London, June 26, 1702. His grandfather was one of the ministers under the Commonwealth, who were ejected in 1662. His father was a London oilman. He was offered by the Duchess of Bedford an University training for ordination in the Church of England, but declined it. He entered Mr. Jennings's non-conformist seminary at Kibworth instead; preached his first sermon at Hinckley, to which Mr. Jennings had removed his academy. In 1723 he was chosen pastor at Kibworth. In 1725 he changed his residence to Market Harborough, still ministering at Kibworth. The settled work of his life as a preceptor and divine began in 1729, with his appointment to the Castle Hill Meeting at Northampton, and continued till in the… Go to person page >

Text Information

First Line: Return, my soul, and seek thy rest
Author: Philip Doddridge

Tune

DEUS TUORUM MILITUM

DEUS TUORUM MILITUM (sometimes called GRENOBLE) was published in France in the 1753 Grenoble Antiphoner as a setting for the text "Deus tuorum militum" (“The God of Your Soldiers”). One of the finest French diocesan tunes from the eighteenth century, it represents a departure in Roman Catholic h…

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Timeline

Media

The Cyber Hymnal #10621
  • PDF (PDF)
  • Noteworthy Composer Score (NWC)

Instances

Instances (1 - 1 of 1)Text InfoTune InfoTextScoreFlexScoreAudioPage Scan
The Cyber Hymnal #10621TextScoreAudio
Include 14 pre-1979 instances



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