Support and Counsel from God, without Merit

Save me, O Lord, from every foe

Author: Isaac Watts
Published in 22 hymnals

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Audio files: MIDI

Full Text

Save me, O Lord, from every foe;
In thee my trust I place,
Though all the good that I can do
Can ne'er deserve thy grace.

Yet if my God prolong my breath,
The saints may profit by 't;
The saints, the glory of the earth,
The men of my delight.

Let heathens to their idols haste,
And worship wood or stone;
But my delightful lot is cast
Where the true God is known.

His hand provides my constant food,
He fills my daily cup;
Much am I pleased with present good,
But more rejoice in hope.

God is my portion and my joy,
His counsels are my light;
He gives me sweet advice by day,
And gentle hints by night.

My soul would all her thoughts approve
To his all-seeing eye;
Not death, nor hell, my hope shall move,
While such a Friend is nigh.

Source: Psalms and Hymns of Isaac Watts, The #Ps.34

Author: Isaac Watts

Isaac Watts was the son of a schoolmaster, and was born in Southampton, July 17, 1674. He is said to have shown remarkable precocity in childhood, beginning the study of Latin, in his fourth year, and writing respectable verses at the age of seven. At the age of sixteen, he went to London to study in the Academy of the Rev. Thomas Rowe, an Independent minister. In 1698, he became assistant minister of the Independent Church, Berry St., London. In 1702, he became pastor. In 1712, he accepted an invitation to visit Sir Thomas Abney, at his residence of Abney Park, and at Sir Thomas' pressing request, made it his home for the remainder of his life. It was a residence most favourable for his health, and for the prosecution of his literary… Go to person page >

Text Information

First Line: Save me, O Lord, from every foe
Title: Support and Counsel from God, without Merit
Author: Isaac Watts
Language: English
Copyright: Public Domain



Composed by Johann Crüger (PHH 42) as a setting for Paul Gerhardt's "Nun danket all’ und bringet Ehr," GRÄFENBERG was first published in the 1647 edition of Crüger's Praxis Pietatis Melica. The tune is arbitrarily named after a water-cure spa in Silesia, Austria, which became famous in the 1820…

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The Cyber Hymnal #5910
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