Savior, Prince of Israel's race

Savior, Prince of Israel's race

Author: Charles Wesley
Published in 40 hymnals

Printable scores: PDF, MusicXML
Audio files: MIDI

Full Text

1. Savior, Prince of Israel’s race,
See me from Thy lofty throne;
Give the sweet relenting grace,
Soften this obdurate stone!
Stone to flesh, O God, convert;
Cast a look, and break my heart!

2. By Thy Spirit, Lord, reprove,
All my inmost sins reveal,
Sins against Thy light and love
Let me see, and let me feel;
Sins that crucified my God,
Spilt again Thy precious blood.

3. Jesu, seek Thy wandering sheep,
Make me restless to return;
Bid me look on Thee, and weep,
Bitterly as Peter mourn,
Till I say, by grace restored,
Now Thou know’st I love Thee, Lord

4. Might I in Thy sight appear,
As the publican distressed,
Stand, not daring to draw near,
Smite on my unworthy breast,
Groan the sinner’s only plea,
God, be merciful to me!

5. O remember me for good,
Passing through the mortal vale!
Show me the atoning blood,
When my strength and spirit fail;
Give my gasping soul to see
Jesus crucified for me!

Source: The Cyber Hymnal #5891

Author: Charles Wesley

Charles Wesley, M.A. was the great hymn-writer of the Wesley family, perhaps, taking quantity and quality into consideration, the great hymn-writer of all ages. Charles Wesley was the youngest son and 18th child of Samuel and Susanna Wesley, and was born at Epworth Rectory, Dec. 18, 1707. In 1716 he went to Westminster School, being provided with a home and board by his elder brother Samuel, then usher at the school, until 1721, when he was elected King's Scholar, and as such received his board and education free. In 1726 Charles Wesley was elected to a Westminster studentship at Christ Church, Oxford, where he took his degree in 1729, and became a college tutor. In the early part of the same year his religious impressions were much deepene… Go to person page >

Text Information

First Line: Savior, Prince of Israel's race
Author: Charles Wesley

Tune

CHRISTOPHER (Peter)

Original text: Ihr Gestirn', ihr hohlen Lüfte. According to Bach-Cantatas.com, the original text by Johann Franck and the original melody by Christoph Peter both date from 1655.

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REDHEAD NO. 76

REDHEAD 76 is named for its composer, who published it as number 76 in his influential Church Hymn Tunes, Ancient and Modern (1853) as a setting for the hymn text "Rock of Ages." It has been associated with Psalm 51 since the 1912 Psalter, where the tune was named AJALON. The tune is also known as P…

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Timeline

Media

The Cyber Hymnal #5891
  • Adobe Acrobat image (PDF)
  • Noteworthy Composer score (NWC)
  • XML score (XML)



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