Glory in the Cross

Author (verses): Venatius Fortunatus

Fortunatus, Venantius Honorius Clementianus, was born at Ceneda, near Treviso, about 530. At an early age he was converted to Christianity at Aquileia. Whilst a student at Ravenna he became almost blind, and recovered his sight, as he believed miraculously, by anointing his eyes with some oil taken from a lamp that burned before the altar of St. Martin of Tours, in a church in that town. His recovery induced him to make a pilgrimage to the shrine of St. Martin, at Tours, in 565, and that pilgrimage resulted in his spending the rest of his life in Gaul. At Poitiers he formed a romantic, though purely platonic, attachment for Queen Rhadegunda, the daughter of Bertharius, king of the Thuringians, and the wife, though separated from him, of Lot… Go to person page >

Translator (v. 1-3): Steven R. Janco

Steve Janco is the director of the Rensselaer Program of Church Music and Liturgy at Saint Joseph's College in Rensselaer, IN. The Rensselaer Program convenes for just over four weeks every summer, offering coursework for M.A. degrees in church music and pastoral liturgy, as well as three-day Liturgy Intensives and its well-known Gregorian Chant Institute. Find out more at Steve has been an institute team member for the North American Forum on the Catechumenate since 1998. Steve is a well-known composer of liturgical music. Mass of the Angels and Saints, published by GIA in 1996, and Mass of Redemption, published by WLP in 2000, are sung widely in the United States and beyond. Steve has had articles… Go to person page >

Translaotr (v. 4): John Mason Neale, 1818-1866

Neale, John Mason, D.D., was born in Conduit Street, London, on Jan. 24, 1818. He inherited intellectual power on both sides: his father, the Rev. Cornelius Neale, having been Senior Wrangler, Second Chancellor's Medallist, and Fellow of St. John's College, Cambridge, and his mother being the daughter of John Mason Good, a man of considerable learning. Both father and mother are said to have been "very pronounced Evangelicals." The father died in 1823, and the boy's early training was entirely under the direction of his mother, his deep attachment for whom is shown by the fact that, not long before his death, he wrote of her as "a mother to whom I owe more than I can express." He was educated at Sherborne Grammar School, and was afterwards… Go to person page >

Text Information

First Line: Sing, my tongue, the hymn of glory
Title: Glory in the Cross
Author (verses): Venatius Fortunatus
Translator (v. 1-3): Steven R. Janco (alt.)
Translaotr (v. 4): John Mason Neale, 1818-1866 (alt.)
Meter: 8 7 8 7 8 7 with refrain
Source: Refrain: Rite of Holy Week
Refrain First Line: We should glory in the cross of our Lord Jesus Christ
Copyright: Refrain © 1972, ICEL; Tr. verses 1-3 © 1997, GIA Publications Inc.


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