Terrible thought, shall I alone

Terrible thought, shall I alone

Author: Charles Wesley
Tune: BANGOR (Tansur)
Published in 59 hymnals

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Full Text

1 Terrible thought! shall I alone,
Who may be sav'd, shall I
Of all, alas! whom I have known,
Through sin for ever die?

2 While all my old companions dear,
With whom I once did live,
Joyful at God’s right hand appear,
A blessing to receive:

3 Shall I, amidst a ghastly band,
Dragg'd to the judgment-seat,
Far on the left with horror stand,
My fearful doom to meet?

4 While they enjoy their Saviour's love,
Must I in torments dwell?
And howl, (while they sing hymns above,)
And blow the flames of hell!

5 Ah! no; I still may turn and live,
For still his wrath delays;
He now vouchsafes a kind reprieve,
And offers me his grace.

6 I will accept his offers now,
From every sin depart;
Perform my oft-repeated vow,
And render him my heart.

7 I will improve what I receive,
The grace through Jesus given;
Sure, if with God on earth I live,
To live with God in heaven.

Source: Hymns, Selected and Original: for public and private worship (1st ed.) #245

Author: Charles Wesley

Charles Wesley, M.A. was the great hymn-writer of the Wesley family, perhaps, taking quantity and quality into consideration, the great hymn-writer of all ages. Charles Wesley was the youngest son and 18th child of Samuel and Susanna Wesley, and was born at Epworth Rectory, Dec. 18, 1707. In 1716 he went to Westminster School, being provided with a home and board by his elder brother Samuel, then usher at the school, until 1721, when he was elected King's Scholar, and as such received his board and education free. In 1726 Charles Wesley was elected to a Westminster studentship at Christ Church, Oxford, where he took his degree in 1729, and became a college tutor. In the early part of the same year his religious impressions were much deepene… Go to person page >

Text Information

First Line: Terrible thought, shall I alone
Author: Charles Wesley
Copyright: Public Domain


BANGOR (Tansur)

Traditionally used for Montgomery's text and for Peter Abelard's "Alone Thou Goest Forth, O Lord," BANGOR comes from William Tans'ur's A Compleat Melody: or the Harmony of Syon (the preface of which is dated 1734). In that collection the tune was a three-part setting for Psalm 12 (and for Psalm 11 i…

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The Cyber Hymnal #6946
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