The God of Abraham Praise

Full Text

1 The God of Abraham praise,
all praise be to His name,
who was, and is, and is to be,
fore'er the same!
The one eternal God,
before what now appears;
the First, the Last: beyond all thought
His timeless years!

2 His Spirit flowing free,
high surging where it will:
in prophet's word He spoke of old,
His voice speaks still.
Established is His law,
and changeless it shall stand,
it lives upon the human heart,
on sea or land.

3 He has eternal life
implanted in the soul;
His love shall be our strength and stay
while ages roll.
Praise to the living God!
All praise be to His name,
who was, and is, and is to be,
fore'er the same!

Source: Celebrating Grace Hymnal #45

Author: Daniel ben Judah

Daniel ben Judah was a Jewish liturgical poet, who lived at Rome in the middle of the fourteenth century CE. He was the grandfather of Daniel ben Samuel ha-Rofe, rabbi at Tivoli. According to Luzzatto, Daniel ben Judah was the author of the well-known hymn "Yigdal Elohim Hai" containing the thirteen articles of belief of Maimonides. This poem, which forms part of the morning prayer among the Ashkenazim, and is sung by the Sephardim on the eve of Sabbaths and holy days, is included in the Romaniot ritual for Saturday evening. --en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Daniel_ben_Judah Go to person page >

Translator: Max Landsberg

Max Landsberg was born in Berlin as the eldest son of a long-established Jewish family, shortly before his father, Meyer Landsberg, in Hildesheim took a job as a rabbi. First, Landsberg was privately educated, but then went to the high school Josephinum in Hildesheim . After graduation he studied in Göttingen, Breslau and Berlin. The training to become a rabbi he received from Lazarus eagle at the University of Kassel, Samuel Ephraim Meyer at the University of Hanover and of Abraham Geiger in Wroclaw. On 7 November 1866 he was codd at the University of Halle with his work Vita sultani Muradi "a Mohammed Amyn Mohibby, e. Mss. Bibliothecae regiae Berolinensis, addita versione latina atque adjectis adnotationibus Dr. phil. Doctorate. Since… Go to person page >

Translator: Newton Mann

Mann, Rev. Newton. (Cazenovia, New York, January 16, 1836--July 25, 1926, Chicago, Illinois). He graduated from Cazenovia Academy, and during the Civil War served as head of the Western Sanitary Commission. He then entered the Unitarian ministry and was ordained as pastor of the church in Kenosha, Wisconsin, which he organized and served for three years. He later served churches in Troy, New York, 1868-1870; Rochester, N.Y., 1870-1888; and Omaha, Nebraska, 1888-1908, after which he retired to Chicago. His only connection with hymnody was his versification of an English translation of the Jewish creedal statement known as the Yigdal. His verse, which has not survived, was later recast by Rev. W.C. Gannett. In its present form the hymn is pro… Go to person page >

Versifier: William Channing Gannett

Gannett, William Channing, M.A., s. of Dr. Ezra Stiles Gannett, was b. at Boston, March 13, 1840, and educated at Harvard College, 1860, and the Divinity School, Cambridge. Entered the Unitarian Ministry in 1868, and after filling several pastorates he became Pastor of the Unitarian Church at Rochester, N.Y., 1889. Mr. Gannett's hymns, mainly written for special occasions, were included in great part in The Thought of God in Hymns and Poems, Boston, 1st Series 1885,2nd Series 1894, the combined production of F. L. Hosmer (q.v.) and himself. Of Mr. Gannett's hymns the following are in common use:— 1. Bring, 0 morn, thy music [God Everlasting.] Written in 1893, and printed in A Chorus of Faith, being an account and resume of the Parli… Go to person page >

Text Information

First Line: The God of Abraham praise; All praised be his name
Title: The God of Abraham Praise
Author: Daniel ben Judah
Translator: Max Landsberg
Translator: Newton Mann
Versifier: William Channing Gannett (ca. 1900, alt.)
Meter: 6.6.8.4 D

Notes

This is essentially the same as Praise to the living God, All praised be his Name, but with the first line changed to the familiar wording of Thomas Oliver's Trinitarian recasting of the originally Jewish text, The God of Abraham praise, Who reigns enthroned above.

Timeline

Media

Baptist Hymnal 1991 #34

Instances

Instances (1 - 4 of 4)Text InfoTune InfoTextScoreFlexScoreAudioPage Scan
Baptist Hymnal 1991 #34TextScoreAudioPage Scan
Celebrating Grace Hymnal #45TextPage Scan
Chalice Hymnal #24TextPage Scan
Community of Christ Sings #94
Include 22 pre-1979 instances



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