There is a river pure and bright

There is a river pure and bright

Author: James Montgomery
Published in 6 hymnals

Full Text

There is a river pure and bright,
Whose streams make glad the heavenly plains,
Where, in eternity of light,
The City of our God remains.

Built by the word of His command,
With His unclouded presence blest,
Firm as His throne, the bulwarks stand;
There is our home, our hope, our rest.

228
Thither let fervent faith aspire;
Our treasure and our heart be there:
Oh! for a seraph's wing of fire!
No,--on the mightier wings of prayer,--

We reach at once that last retreat,
And, ranged among the ransom'd throng,
Fall with the elders at His feet,
Whose Name alone inspires their song.

Ah! soon, how soon! our spirits droop;
Unwont the air of heaven to breathe;
Yet God, in very deed, will stoop,
And dwell Himself with men beneath.

Come to thy living temples, then,
As in the ancient times appear;
Let earth be Paradise again,
And man, O God! thine image here.

Sacred Poems and Hymns

Author: James Montgomery

Montgomery, James, son of John Montgomery, a Moravian minister, was born at Irvine, Ayrshire, Nov. 4, 1771. In 1776 he removed with his parents to the Moravian Settlement at Gracehill, near Ballymena, county of Antrim. Two years after he was sent to the Fulneck Seminary, Yorkshire. He left Fulneck in 1787, and entered a retail shop at Mirfield, near Wakefield. Soon tiring of that he entered upon a similar situation at Wath, near Rotherham, only to find it quite as unsuitable to his taste as the former. A journey to London, with the hope of finding a publisher for his youthful poems ended in failure; and in 1792 he was glad to leave Wath for Shefield to join Mr. Gales, an auctioneer, bookseller, and printer of the Sheffield Register newspap… Go to person page >

Text Information

First Line: There is a river pure and bright
Author: James Montgomery
Meter: 8.8.8.8
Language: English

Notes

There is a river pure and bright. J. Montgomery. [Hope of Heaven.] From his Original Hymns, 1853, No. 229, in 6 stanzas of 4 lines. In the Rugby School Chapel Hymns, 1872 and 1906, it is abbreviated to stanzas i-iv.

--John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology, New Supplement (1907)

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