We Come to This Table

Full Text

We come to this table, O God, with thanksgiving.
We lift up our hearts, we remember, we pray.
We hear Jesus' welcome—inviting, forgiving;
We know your Spirit's peace as we feast here today.

We dine at your table as sisters and brothers,
Diverse in our cultures, yet nourished as one.
The bread and the cup that we share here with others
Are gifts uniting all who are claimed by your Son.

We grieve for your world here; we cry, "How much longer?"
We pray for the cycles of violence to cease.
Yet here, in Christ broken, we're fed and made stronger
To labor in his name for a world filled with peace.

We rise from this table with new dedication
To feed the world's children, to free the oppressed,
To clear out the minefields, to care for creation;
We pray, O God of peace, that our work will be blest.


Source: Songs of Grace: new hymns for God and neighbor #40

Author: Carolyn Winfrey Gillette

Carolyn Winfrey Gillette is a hymn writer and Presbyterian pastor. Carolyn and her husband Bruce have been the co-pastors of Limestone Presbyterian Church in Wilmington, Delaware since August 2004. Carolyn's hymns have been sung by congregations in every state of the USA and in several other countries; they have been on national PBS-TV three times and the BBC-TV in the United Kingdom. Noel Paul Stookey of "Peter, Paul and Mary" made a music video with Emmy winner Pete Staman of Carolyn's hymn, "O God, Our Words Cannot Express," which was written on September 11. Her hymns are found on the national websites of the General Board of Discipleship of The United Methodist Church, UMCOR, the Presbyterian Church (USA), American Baptist Church… Go to person page >

Text Information

First Line: We come to this table, O God, with thanksgiving
Title: We Come to This Table
Original Language: English
Author: Carolyn Winfrey Gillette (2002)
Meter: 12.11.12.11
Language: English
Publication Date: 2002
Copyright: Copyright © 2002 by Carolyn Winfrey Gillette. All rights reserved

Tune

KREMSER

The tune KREMSER owes its origin to a sixteenth-century Dutch folk song "Ey, wilder den wilt." Later the tune was combined with the Dutch patriotic hymn 'Wilt heden nu treden" in Adrianus Valerius's Nederlandtsch Gedenckclanck [sic: Nederlandtsche Gedenckclank] published posthumously in 1626. 'Wilt…

Go to tune page >


Instances

Instances (1 - 1 of 1)Text InfoTune InfoTextScoreFlexScoreAudioPage Scan
Songs of Grace: new hymns for God and neighbor #40Text



Advertisements