We saw Thee not when Thou didst come

Full Text

1 We saw thee not when thou didst come
To this poor world of sin and death;
Nor yet beheld thy cottage home,
In that despised Nazareth;
But we believe thy footsteps trod
Its streets and plains, thou Son of God;
But we believe thy footsteps trod
Its streets and plains, thou Son of God.

2 We saw thee not when lifted high
Amid that wild and savage crew;
Nor heard we that imploring cry,
"Forgive, they know not what they do!"
But we believe the deed was done,
That shook the earth and veiled the sun;
But we believe the deed was done,
That shook the earth and veiled the sun.

3 We gazed not in the open tomb
Where once thy mangled body lay;
Nor saw thee in that "upper room,"
Nor met thee on the open way;
But we believe that angels said,
"Why seek the living with the dead?"
But we believe that angels said,
"Why seek the living with the dead?"

4 We walked not with the chosen few
Who saw thee from the earth ascend;
Who raised to heaven their wondering view,
Then low to earth all prostrate bend;
But we believe that human eyes
Beheld that journey to the skies;
But we believe that human eyes
Beheld that journey to the skies.

Source: The Christian Sunday School Hymnal: a compilation of choice hymns and tunes for Sunday schools #24

Author: Anne R. Richter

Richter, Anne, ne'e Rigby, was the third daughter of the Rev. Robert Rigby, Vicar of St. Mary's, Beverley, Yorkshire, from 1791 to 1823, and married the Rev. W. H. Richter, sometime Chaplain of the County Gaol at Kirton Lindsey, Lincolnshire, and then Rector of St. Paul's, Lincoln. Mrs. Richter died at 23 Minster Yard, Lincoln, in 1857. She contributed to various magazines, and published The Nun and Other Poems, Hull, 1841. Her intimate literary acquaintances included Mrs. Hemans. Mrs. Richter was descended from the celebrated John Bradshaw, whose name is the first in the list of the signatures on the death warrant of Charles I. Her hymn, "We have not seen Thy footsteps tread," in its altered form as "We saw Thee not when Thou didst come,"… Go to person page >

Alterer: John Hampden Gurney

Gurney, John Hampden, M.A., eldest son of Sir John Gurney, a Baron of the Exchequer, was born in Serjeants’ Inn, London, Aug. 15, 1802, and educated at Trinity College, Cambridge, where he graduated in 1824. On taking Holy Orders he became Curate of Lutterworth (1827-1844), and subsequently Hector of St. Mary's, Marylebone, and Prebendary of St. Paul's Cathedral. He died in London, March 8, 1862. The Society for Promoting Christian Knowledge and other religious societies had his cordial sympathy, and received his active support. His publications include several small volumes in prose, and the following:— (1) Church Psalmody; Hints for the improvement of a Collection of Hymns published by the Society for Promoting Christian Knowledge, 1… Go to person page >

Text Information

Tune

CREDO (Stainer)

John Stainer (b. Southwark, London, England, 1840; d. Verona, Italy, 1901) composed CREDO for the text "We Saw Thee Not When Thou Didst Come"; the tune was published in Hymns Ancient and Modern (1875). CREDO, like some other Victorian tunes, depends as much on its harmonization as on its melody for…

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WE SAW THEE NOT


ST. SILAS (Filby)


Timeline

Media

The Book of Common Praise: being the hymn book of The Church of England in Canada (revised 1938) #513b
The Cyber Hymnal #7238
  • Adobe Acrobat image (PDF)
  • Noteworthy Composer score (NWC)
  • XML score (XML)

Instances

Instances (1 - 3 of 3)Text InfoTune InfoTextScoreFlexScoreAudioPage Scan
Hymns for Today's Church (2nd ed.) #121
Small Church Music #1937Audio
The Cyber Hymnal #7238TextScoreAudio
Include 69 pre-1979 instances



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