What shall I do my God to love

What shall I do my God to love

Author: Charles Wesley
Published in 51 hymnals

Printable scores: PDF, MusicXML
Audio files: MIDI, Recording

Full Text

1. What shall I do, my God to love,
My loving God to praise!
The length, and breadth, and height to prove
And depth of sovereign grace?

2. Thy sovereign grace to all extends,
Immense and unconfined;
From age to age it never ends,
It reaches all mankind.

3. Throughout the world its breadth is known,
Wide as infinity,
So wide it never passed by one;
Or it had passed by me.

4. My trespass was grown up to Heaven;
But far above the skies,
In Christ abundantly forgiven,
I see Thy mercies rise!

5. The depth of all-redeeming love,
What angel-tongue can tell?
O may I to the utmost prove
The gift unspeakable!

6. Deeper than hell, it plucked me thence;
Deeper than inbred sin:
Jesus’ love my heart shall cleanse,
When Jesus enters in.

7. Come quickly, then, my Lord, and take
Possession of Thine own;
My longing heart vouchsafe to make
Thine everlasting throne.

8. Assert Thy claim, receive Thy right,
Come quickly from above,
And sink me to perfection’s height,
The depth of humble love.

Source: The Cyber Hymnal #7658

Author: Charles Wesley

Charles Wesley, M.A. was the great hymn-writer of the Wesley family, perhaps, taking quantity and quality into consideration, the great hymn-writer of all ages. Charles Wesley was the youngest son and 18th child of Samuel and Susanna Wesley, and was born at Epworth Rectory, Dec. 18, 1707. In 1716 he went to Westminster School, being provided with a home and board by his elder brother Samuel, then usher at the school, until 1721, when he was elected King's Scholar, and as such received his board and education free. In 1726 Charles Wesley was elected to a Westminster studentship at Christ Church, Oxford, where he took his degree in 1729, and became a college tutor. In the early part of the same year his religious impressions were much deepene… Go to person page >

Tune

JERUSALEM (Grosvenor)


STELLA (English)

First published in Henri Frederick Hemy's Easy Hymn Tunes for Catholic Schools (1851), STELLA was a folk tune from northern England that Hemy heard sung by children in Stella, a village near Newcastle-upon-Tyme. In modified bar form (AA'B), the tune has an interesting rhythmic structure. Antiphonal…

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ABRIDGE (Smith)


Timeline

Media

The Cyber Hymnal #7658
  • Adobe Acrobat image (PDF)
  • Noteworthy Composer score (NWC)
  • XML score (XML)
Small Church Music #2490
  • PDF Score (PDF)

Instances

Instances (1 - 11 of 11)Text InfoTune InfoTextScoreFlexScoreAudioPage Scan
Common Praise: A new edition of Hymns Ancient and Modern #615Page Scan
Hymns and Psalms: a Methodist and ecumenical hymn book #46a
Hymns and Psalms: a Methodist and ecumenical hymn book #46b
Hymns and Psalms: a Methodist and ecumenical hymn book #47
Singing the Faith #436a
Singing the Faith #436b
Singing the Faith #516
Small Church Music #2328Audio
Small Church Music #2490Audio
The Cyber Hymnal #7658TextScoreAudio
Together in Song: Australian hymn book II #122
Include 40 pre-1979 instances



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