Why should our garments, made to hide

Why should our garments, made to hide

Author: Isaac Watts (1715)
Published in 15 hymnals

Full Text

Why should our garments, made to hide
Our parents’ shame, provoke our pride?
The art of dress did ne’er begin
Till Eve our mother learnt to sin.

70
When first she put the covering on,
Her robe of innocence was gone;
And yet her children vainly boast
In the sad marks of glory lost.

How proud we are! how fond to shew
Our clothes, and call them rich and new,
When the poor sheep and silkworms wore
That very clothing long before!

The tulip and the butterfly
Appear in gayer coats than I:
Let me be dress’d fine as I will,
Flies, worms, and flowers exceed me still.

71
Then will I set my heart to find
Inward adornings of the mind:
Knowledge and virtue, truth and grace,
These are the robes of richest dress.

No more shall worms with me compare,
This is the raiment angels wear:
The Son of God, when here below,
Put on this blest apparel too.

It never fades, it ne’er grows old,
Nor fears the rain, nor moth, nor mould:
It takes no spot, but still refines;
The more ‘tis worn, the more it shines.

72
In this on earth would I appear,
Then go to heaven, and wear it there:
God will approve it in his sight;
’Tis his own work, and his delight.



Source: Divine and Moral Songs: attempted in easy language for the use of children with some additional composures #HXXII

Author: Isaac Watts

Isaac Watts was the son of a schoolmaster, and was born in Southampton, July 17, 1674. He is said to have shown remarkable precocity in childhood, beginning the study of Latin, in his fourth year, and writing respectable verses at the age of seven. At the age of sixteen, he went to London to study in the Academy of the Rev. Thomas Rowe, an Independent minister. In 1698, he became assistant minister of the Independent Church, Berry St., London. In 1702, he became pastor. In 1712, he accepted an invitation to visit Sir Thomas Abney, at his residence of Abney Park, and at Sir Thomas' pressing request, made it his home for the remainder of his life. It was a residence most favourable for his health, and for the prosecution of his literary… Go to person page >

Text Information

First Line: Why should our garments, made to hide
Author: Isaac Watts (1715)
Meter: 8.8.8.8
Language: English

Timeline

Instances

Instances (1 - 15 of 15)Text InfoTune InfoTextScoreFlexScoreAudioPage Scan
A Collection of Hymns, More Particularly Designed for the Use of the West Society in Boston. (2nd ed. with Additions) #LXXXIPage Scan
Choice Hymns: for social and private devotion, Lord's Day schools and revivals. (2nd ed.) #75Page Scan
Divine and Moral Songs: attempted in easy language for the use of children with some additional composures #HXXIITextPage Scan
Divine Songs for Children #XXIITextPage Scan
Divine Songs: attempted in easy language, for the use of children #22Page Scan
Hymns for Children and Young Persons. First Am. from the London ed. #d158
Hymns for Schools and Families #d573
Hymns for Schools and Families, Specailly Designed for the Children of the Church #359Page Scan
Hymns, Selected from Various Authors, for the Use of Young Persons 3rd Am. from 9th London ed. #d280
Hymns, Selected from Various Authors, for the Use of Young Persons #d258
Selection of Hymns for the Sunday School Union of the Methodist Episcopal Church #124Page Scan
Songs, Divine and Moral #108Page Scan
Sunday School Harmonist #d20
The New Sunday-School Harmonist #d102
Watt's Divine Songs For the use of Children #22Page Scan



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