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All People That on Earth Do Dwell

Scripture References

Quoted or directly alluded to:

Further Reflections on Scripture References

Psalm 100 brings to a close a collection of psalms that celebrate the LORD's righteous rule over all creation (93, 95-99). Like the others, it was composed to be sung by the Levites at a high religious festival that annually celebrated the LORD's kingship over the entire world (perhaps the Feast of Tabernacles). Psalm 100 is the Hebrew equivalent of a cheerleader's shout–a strong call to worship the LORD with joyful song (st. 1, 3): the LORD is the one true God who made us to be "the sheep of his pasture" (st. 2), and God's love and faithfulness never fail (st. 4).

Confessions and Statements of Faith References

Further Reflections on Confessions and Statements of Faith References

The truths of Genesis, that “he (God) formed us without our aid” resounds in stanza 2 and is paralleled in Heidelberg Catechism, Lord’s Day 9, Question and Answer 26, Belgic Confession, Article 12; and Our World Belongs to God, paragraph 8, which states that God the Father created the world “out of nothing.”
 
Stanza 4 speaks of the nature of God as goodness, mercy and faithfulness; this list is enlarged in Belgic Confession, Article 1: God is “eternal, incomprehensible, invisible, unchangeable, infinite, almighty; completely wise, just and good, and the overflowing source of all good.”
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All People That on Earth Do Dwell

Call to Worship

A call to worship especially mindful of children
God makes the sun rise and set.
He is faithful from generation to generation.
God makes summer and winter come and go.
He is faithful from generation to generation.
God helps plants grow and flowers bloom.
He is faithful from generation to generation.
God gives us food to eat, places to live, and people to love us.
He is faithful from generation to generation.
God is always with us.
He is faithful from generation to generation.
God keeps his promises to us.
He is faithful from generation to generation.
Let us praise our faithful God.
The Worship Sourcebook, B.1.2.3
— The Worship Sourcebook, 2nd Edition (http://www.faithaliveresources.org/Products/420021/the-worship-sourcebook.aspx)

A call to worship especially mindful of children
God makes the sun rise and set.
He is faithful from generation to generation.
God makes summer and winter come and go.
He is faithful from generation to generation.
God helps plants grow and flowers bloom.
He is faithful from generation to generation.
God gives us food to eat, places to live, and people to love us.
He is faithful from generation to generation.
God is always with us.
He is faithful from generation to generation.
God keeps his promises to us.
He is faithful from generation to generation.
Let us praise our faithful God.
— Worship Sourcebook Edition Two

Words of Praise

In you, infinite God, we live and move and have our being.
You have been our dwelling place throughout all generations.
Before the mountains were born
or you brought forth the whole world,
from everlasting to everlasting you are God.
We praise and adore you, everlasting God.
But we are creatures of dust who return to dust.
In the morning you wake us up into the thunder of life.
In the evening you sweep us away in the sleep of death.
We are only mortals, mere transients in the world.
Our days quickly pass, and we fly away.
We bow before you, everlasting God.
Our times are in your hands, because
from everlasting to everlasting you are God.
So teach us to number our days,
that we may gain a heart of wisdom.
We need your guidance, everlasting God.
You could condemn us with just cause.
Because of our sin, you could consume us with your anger,
yet you surround us with compassion.
Your unfailing love is all we need.
We thank you, everlasting God.
May we sing for joy all our days.
Bless our work and our lives
so that they may testify to your glory.
We worship you, everlasting God,
through Jesus Christ, our Lord. Amen.
—based on Psalm 90
The Worship Sourcebook, A.1.4.12
 
— The Worship Sourcebook, 2nd Edition (http://www.faithaliveresources.org/Products/420021/the-worship-sourcebook.aspx)

Loving God,
you created heaven and earth out of nothing.
You uphold and rule heaven and earth
by your eternal counsel and providence.
We give you praise, almighty God.
God of eternity,
you not only created each of us,
but you sustain and form each of us
with your Holy Spirit.
We worship you, Creator God.
You provide whatever we need for body and soul.
You guide us and guard us.
We trust in you, God, our Maker; Jesus, our Mediator;
Holy Spirit, our Comforter.
As we turn toward the promise of a new year,
allow us to look back and to look ahead,
to see the places in the past
where your promises have upheld us,
and to look to an unknown future
with confidence and trust in you.
In the strong name of Christ we pray. Amen.
— Worship Sourcebook Edition Two

Almighty and ever present God,
you uphold heaven and earth and all creatures.
All things come from your generous hand:
You send the nourishing rain, the refreshing wind,
the warming sun, the blustering snow.
You make buds appear, flowers bloom,
fruit grow, and harvests mature.
Through each day of our lives,
whether in sickness or health,
prosperity or poverty, joy or sorrow,
you are in control.
Help us to be patient when things go against us,
thankful when things go well,
and always confident that nothing
could ever separate us from your love.
For your unending faithfulness, we thank and praise you.
To you be glory, now and forever. Amen.
—based on Heidelberg Catechism, Q&A’s 27-28
— Worship Sourcebook Edition Two

Confession

Almighty God, giver of every good and perfect gift,
forgive us for ignoring your gifts, misusing your gifts,
even abusing your gifts.
We repent of our feelings of entitlement,
of our lack of generosity, of our ingratitude.
Forgive us, we pray, for Jesus’ sake. Amen.
The Worship Sourcebook, C.2.2.3
— The Worship Sourcebook, 2nd Edition (http://www.faithaliveresources.org/Products/420021/the-worship-sourcebook.aspx)

Additional Prayers

Closing Prayer
Covenant God, your Word tells us of your faithfulness in the lives of your people,
and we have seen your faithfulness in our lives.
May we confidently live in the peace and hope that come from being your children
so that we may share your love with others. For Jesus’ sake, Amen.
The Worship Sourcebook, B.9.1.3
— The Worship Sourcebook, 2nd Edition (http://www.faithaliveresources.org/Products/420021/the-worship-sourcebook.aspx)

Almighty God,
do take care of all our physical needs
so that we come to know
that you are the only source of everything good
and that neither our work and worry
nor your gifts can do us any good without your blessing.
And so help us to give up our trust in creatures
and trust in you alone.
Through Jesus Christ, our Lord. Amen.
—from Heidelberg Catechism, Q&A 125
The Worship Sourcebook, C.4.4.2
— The Worship Sourcebook, 2nd Edition (http://www.faithaliveresources.org/Products/420021/the-worship-sourcebook.aspx)

We thank you and we praise you, faithful God.
By your power at work within us, may we cheerfully proclaim your goodness,
selflessly show your love, and joyfully come into your presence.
You are our God. We are your people, now and always.
Hallelujah! Amen.

An Acclamation
 
God is worthy of praise in a thousand tongues.
Let English and French tongues praise him.
Let Dutch and Hungarian tongues praise him.
Let Swahili and Arabic tongues praise him.
Let Chinese and Korean tongues praise him.
Let all people on earth praise him in Jesus’ name. Amen.
 
— Cornelius Plantinga, Jr.
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All People That on Earth Do Dwell

Tune Information

Name
GENEVAN 134/OLD HUNDREDTH
Key
G Major or modal
Meter
8.8.8.8.
Alternate Tune
Genevan 100

Recordings

Recommended External Arrangements/Resources

Concertatoes
Vaughan Williams, Ralph. The Old Hundredth Psalm Tune. Oxford 978-0-19-354721-6 [SATB, congregation, organ and brass]
 
Instrument and Organ
Burkhardt, Michael. Five Hymn Accompaniments for Brass Quartet and Organ, set 2. Morningstar MSM-20-843
 
Alternate Harmonizations for Organ
Burkhardt, Michael. 5 Psalm Hymn Improvisations. Morningstar MSM-10-511 [1997]
Fedak, Alfred V. 25 More Harmonizations. Selah 160-729 [1998]
Hobby, Robert A. All People That on Earth Do Dwell. Morningstar MSM-10-602
Rawsthorne, Noel. 200 Last Verses. Kevin Mayhew ISBN 0 86209 189 6 [1991]
 
Alternate Harmonizations for Piano
Hopson, Hal H. The Creative Use of the Piano in Worship. Hope 8392 [2008]
Organ, Anne Krentz. Let It Rip! At the Piano. vol. 2 Augsburg ISBN 0-8006-7580-0 [2003]
 
Organ Service Music
Burkhardt, Michael. Five Psalm Improvisations. Morningstar MSM-10-511 [1997]
Burkhardt, Michael. Praise and Thanksgiving. set 2 Morningstar MSM-10-752 [1989]
Cherwien, David. Interpretations. Bk. 8 Lorenz AMSP105 [status:print on demand]
Purcell, Henry. Ceremonial Music for Organ. Theodore Presser PR453000900
Willan, Healy. Ten Hymn Preludes. set 1 Peters 6011 [1956]
 
Piano Service Music
Davenport, Rudy. Darkness and Light: Seasonal Reflections for Piano. Morningstar MSM-15-839 [2010] (M)
 
 
— Norma de Waal Malefyt

Additional External Arrangements/Resources

Congregational Singing Resources:
Instrument and Organ
Blair, Dallas. Hymn Introductions and Descants for Trumpet and Organ – set 2. Morningstar MSM-20-702 (M)
Kellermeyer, David M. Doxology for Bells. Morningstar MSM-30-131 [Organ and Handbells]
 
Alternate Harmonizations for Organ
Archer, Malcolm. After the Last Verse. Kevin Mayhew ISBN 0 86209 502 6 [1995]
Hancock, Gerre. Organ Improvisations for Hymn Singing. Hinshaw HMO-100 [1975]
Mawby, Colin.  Hymns for Occasions. Kevin Mayhew ISBN 0-86209-568-9 [1994]
Noble, T. Tertius.Free Organ Accompaniments to One Hundred Well-Known Hymn Tunes. Alfred  AP.FE 08175
Proulx, Richard. Hymn Intonations Preludes & Free Harmonizations. Vol. I Selah 160-720 [1991]
 
 
Service Music Resources:
Organ
Callahan, Charles. Psalm of Praise. Concordia 97-6790 [1999]
Culli, Benjamin. Saints with Christ. Concordia 97-7226 [2007] (√; E-M;  a collection suitable for  funerals)
Culli, Benjamin M. Two Triptychs for Organ. Concordia 97-7252 [2007] (M)
Ferguson, John. Three Psalm Preludes. Augsburg 11-10823 [1997]
Manz, Paul. Ten Chorale Improvisations. Set 4 Morningstar MSM-10-354 [2011]
 
Handbells
Kerkorian, Greg. Old Hundreth. Lake State HB00066 [2000] (3 octaves, M)
 
— Norma de Waal Malefyt
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All People That on Earth Do Dwell

Hymn Story/Background

Psalm 100 brings to a close a collection of psalms that celebrate the LORD's righteous rule over all creation.  Like Psalms 93 and 95-99, Psalm 100 was composed to be sung by the Levites at a high religious festival that annually celebrated the LORD's kingship over the entire world (perhaps the Feast of Tabernacles). Psalm 100 is the Hebrew equivalent of a cheerleader's shout–a strong call to worship the LORD with joyful song (st. 1, 3): the LORD is the one true God who made us to be "the sheep who by his hand were made" (st. 2), and because God's love and faithfulness never fail (st. 4).
 
The 16th-Century text by William Kethe (with modern spelling) is perhaps the oldest English psalm versification that continues to be sung today. And the tune, GENEVAN 134, is probably the most sung church melody throughout the world. It is one of the noblest and most loved tunes in all of Christendom. It was composed by Louis Bourgeois and first published in the 1551 edition of the Genevan Psalter, which he also edited. The tune was originally composed for Ps. 134, but ever since it was set to Kethe’s setting of Psalm 100 in the Anglo-Genevan Psalter of 1561, the popular name for the tune has been OLD HUNDREDTH.  This tune is also traditionally associated with Thomas Ken's doxology text "Praise God, from Whom All Blessings Flow."
 
The English text by William Kethe (b. Scotland [?], date unknown; d. Dorset, England, c. 1594) first appeared in the Anglo-Genevan Psalter of 1561 and in John Day's Psalmes of David in English Metre, also of 1561. Since then it has been published in virtually all English-language psalters and hymnals. The French text is taken from the French hymnal Psaumes et Cantiques (1891); it is included as a tribute to the original language of the Calvinist Psalter.
 
Lift Up Your Hearts retains the slightly altered version introduced by sixteenth-century English psalters: the last phrase of the melody originally began with three half notes. During the last few centuries GENEVAN 134 was usually sung in isorhythm (all notes of equal value). 
 
Though GENEVAN 134 should be sung with conviction, its use for this text does not require the jubilant character of the doxology; the psalm text is rather a call to praise (st. 1) and a benediction (st. 2). Stanza 1 can be appropriately sung by the congregation in the traditional harmony, and stanza 2 by a minister or choir using the famous John Dowland setting (1621) with the melody in the tenor. For festive occasions (such as an ordination or a wedding), the congregation can conclude the psalm by singing the doxology (965).
 
— Bert Polman

Author Information

Psalm 100 is the source of this text, and the English setting is by William Kethe (b. Scotland [?], d. Dorset England, c. 1594).  Although both the time and place of Kethe's birth and death are unknown, scholars think he was a Scotsman. A Protestant, he fled to the continent during Queen Mary's persecution in the late 1550s. He lived in Geneva for some time but traveled to Basel and Strasbourg to maintain contact with other English refugees. Kethe is thought to be one of the scholars who translated and published the English-language Geneva Bible (1560), a version favored over the King James Bible by the Pilgrim fathers. The twenty-five psalm versifications Kethe prepared for the Anglo-Genevan Psalter of 1561 were also adopted into the Scottish Psalter of 1565. His versification of Psalm 100 is the only one that found its way into modern psalmody.
 
Given the invitation for “All People That on Earth Do Dwell” to praise God, several other languages are included as well by various writers to be able to be sung to OLD HUNDREDTH.
 
 
— Bert Polman

Composer Information

OLD HUNDEDTH is the most universally known and loved tune by Louis Bourgeois (b. Paris, France, c. 1510; d. Paris, 1561). In both his early and later years Bourgeois wrote French songs to entertain the rich, but in the history of church music he is known especially for his contribution to the Genevan Psalter. Apparently moving to Geneva in 1541, the same year John Calvin returned to Geneva from Strasbourg, Bourgeois served as cantor and master of the choristers at both St. Pierre and St. Gervais, which is to say he was music director there under the pastoral leadership of Calvin. Bourgeois used the choristers to teach the new psalm tunes to the congregation.
 
The extent of Bourgeois's involvement in the Genevan Psalter is a matter of scholar­ly debate. Calvin had published several partial psalters, including one in Strasbourg in 1539 and another in Geneva in 1542, with melodies by unknown composers. In 1551 another French psalter appeared in Geneva, Eighty-three Psalms of David, with texts by Marot and de Beze, and with most of the melodies by Bourgeois, who supplied thirty­ four original tunes and thirty-six revisions of older tunes. This edition was republished repeatedly, and later Bourgeois's tunes were incorporated into the complete Genevan Psalter (1562). However, his revision of some older tunes was not uniformly appreciat­ed by those who were familiar with the original versions; he was actually imprisoned overnight for some of his musical arrangements but freed after Calvin's intervention. In addition to his contribution to the 1551 Psalter, Bourgeois produced a four-part harmonization of fifty psalms, published in Lyons (1547, enlarged 1554), and wrote a textbook on singing and sight-reading, La Droit Chemin de Musique (1550). He left Geneva in 1552 and lived in Lyons and Paris for the remainder of his life.
 
— Bert Polman
Hymnary.org does not have a score for this hymn.



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