566

Give Praise to Our God

Scripture References

Further Reflections on Scripture References

See how Psalm 148 is the primary reference, but a similar thought is found in Psalms 8, 33, 104, and 135. In addition, God’s provocative questions to Job in Job 38-41 aim to stir similar praise, awe and humility. However, back in Genesis 1 and 2 we are motivated to do the same.

Confessions and Statements of Faith References

Further Reflections on Confessions and Statements of Faith References

Sometimes the soul of the Christian needs to cry out exuberantly with joy, thanks, and adoration, even without identifying the reasons for such praise and adoration. Moreover, Christians who gather corporately find it fitting to do so as the grateful body of Christ. The Confessions of the church recognize this natural expression. Belgic Confession, Article 1 sees God as the “overflowing source of all good,” and such a realization deserves an “Alleluia!” Heidelberg Catechism, Lord’s Day 1, Question and Answer 2 is a reminder that living in the joy of our comfort involves a spirit of thanks for his deliverance. In the same spirit, Our World Belongs to God, paragraph 2 exclaims, “God is King: Let the earth be glad! Christ is victor: his rule has begun! The Spirit is at work: creation is renewed!” and then as a natural response cries: “Hallelujah! Praise the Lord!”
566

Give Praise to Our God

Additional Prayers

Sovereign God,
we dance and sing for joy because you have called us to be your people
and have given us victory through our Lord Jesus Christ.
Armor us with his grace and embolden us with the Spirit’s power,
so that we may faithfully struggle for peace and justice everywhere. Amen.
566

Give Praise to Our God

Tune Information

Name
LAUDATE DOMINUM
Key
B♭ Major
Meter
10.10.11.11
566

Give Praise to Our God

Hymn Story/Background

LAUDATE DOMINUM (Latin words for the opening phrase of Psalm 150) comes from the end of the anthem "Hear My Words, O Ye People" by C. Hubert H. Parry, an anthem he composed in 1894 for a festival of the Salisbury Diocesan Choral Association. Parry's tune was set to Baker's text in the 1916 Supplement of Hymns Ancient and Modern, replacing an earlier LAUDATE DOMINUM by Henry J. Gauntlett for Baker's text. Parry's tune is an inspired melody from a great tune writer who rarely came to church but who produced some of the best hymn tunes in the later Victorian era.
— Bert Polman

Author Information

The 1912 Psalter was the first ecumenical psalter published in the United States and the most widely used metrical psalter of the twentieth century in North America.  The United Presbyterian Church invited all other Reformed and Presbyterian denominations to join them in the effort to provide a new versifications of the psalms; six Presbyterian denominations, as well as the Christian Reformed Church and the Reformed Church in America joined in the effort in revising the 1887 Psalter (whose texts actually dated back to the 1871 Book of Psalms; the 1887 edition had added music to the texts.).  The 1912 Psalter included all the psalms in 413 settings, eight doxologies, and the three Lukan canticles (Song of Mary, Song of Zechariah, and Song of Simeon).
— Bert Polman and Jack Reiffer

Composer Information

Sir Charles Hubert Hastings Parry, 1st Baronet (b. February 27, 1848; d. October 7, 1918) was an English composer, teacher and historian of music.
 
Parry's first major works appeared in 1880. As a composer he is best known for the choral song Jerusalem, the coronation anthem I Was Glad, and the hymn tune Repton, which sets the words "Dear Lord and Father of Mankind." He was director of the Royal College of Music from 1895 until his death and was also professor of music at the University of Oxford from 1900 to 1908. He also wrote several books about music and music history. Some contemporaries rated him as the finest English composer since Henry Purcell, but his academic duties prevented him from devoting all his energies to composition.
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