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The Ends of All the Earth Shall Hear

Scripture References

Thematically related:

Further Reflections on Scripture References

The text is based on Psalm 22:27-31, the "vow of praise" part of this lament psalm (see PHH 22 for further comments on Psalm 22). It was first published with Doane's tune in the 1912 Psalter and in every edition of the Psalter Hymnal.
 
This text confesses with great certainty the worldwide rule of Christ, the Lord of lords and King of kings. All peoples and nations will submit to his reign (st. 1-2), for both rich and poor and future genera­tions will confess the mighty deeds of the Lord (st. 3-4).
 
Bert Polman, Psalter Hymnal Handbook

Confessions and Statements of Faith References

Further Reflections on Confessions and Statements of Faith References

The God who was active in providing his Son for our redemption, has also been active in the course of history and in the lives of his people. His activity in the course of history began when he created all things. Belgic Confession, Article 12 teaches that God, “when it seemed good to him, created heaven and earth and all other creatures from nothing, by the Word—that is to say, by the Son.” In addition, “God created human beings from the dust of the earth and made and formed them in his image and likeness.”
 
His activity also includes his constant care for all he has created. “…He watches over us with fatherly care, sustaining all creatures under his lordship” (Belgic Confession, Article 13). Additionally, God reveals himself by this “creation, preservation and government of the universe, since that universe is before our eyes like a beautiful book...” (Belgic Confession, Article 2).
 

We also believe that God’s mighty acts are revealed “in the unfolding of covenant history…witnessing to the news that Our World Belongs to God and he loves it deeply” (Our World Belongs to God, paragraph 33). Primary among these actions in the unfolding of covenant history is “the long road of redemption to reclaim the lost as his people and the world as his kingdom” (paragraph 18). As God’s people observe his work in their lives and in history they respond with praise and adoration.

Additional Prayers

Merciful God, some of your children are joyfully singing your praise.
Others are languishing in despair.
Through Jesus you are acquainted with our grief
and in him we have resurrection hope.
Bind up those who are broken, bless those who are dying, shield those who are joyous,
and lead us all to your house, where we may feast together at your table. Amen.

Tune Information

Name
VISION
Key
D Major
Meter
8.8.8.8 refrain 8.8

Recordings

Hymn Story/Background

The text is based on Psalm 22:27-31, the "vow of praise" part of this lament psalm. It was first published with Doane's tune in the 1912 Psalter and in many Christian Reformed hymnals since then.
 
This text confesses with great certainty the worldwide rule of Christ, the Lord of lords and King of kings. All peoples and nations will submit to his reign (st. 1-2), for both rich and poor and future generations will confess the mighty deeds of the Lord (st. 3-4).
 
This tune, VISION, composed by William H. Doane, was first published in the 1883 Baptist Hymnal, of which Doane was musical editor. There the tune, named GOD OF OUR STRENGTH, was set to the 1882 Francis J. Van Alstyne (pseudonym for Fanny J. Crosby) text "God of Our Strength, Enthroned Above." In the 1912 Psalter and all subsequent editions of the Psalter Hymnal, VISION was set to "The Ends of All the Earth Shall Hear." Presumably its name comes from the visionary nature of this text.
 
Sing in harmony with forceful accompaniment. Use brass instruments for festive services.
— Bert Polman

Composer Information

An industrialist and philanthropist, William H. Doane (b. 1832; d. 1915) was also a staunch supporter of evangelistic campaigns and a prolific writer of hymn tunes. He was head of a large woodworking machinery plant in Cincinnati and a civic leader in that city. He showed his devotion to the church by supporting the work of the evangelistic team of Dwight L. Moody and Ira D. Sankey and by endowing Moody Bible Institute in Chicago and Denison University in Granville, Ohio. An amateur composer, Doane wrote over twenty-two hundred hymn and gospel song tunes, and he edited over forty songbooks.
— Bert Polman
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